zoroko:

I’ve been in a bit of an art rut and works been kicking my ass, so have a couple pictures of my new Ramona costume that I wore last weekend at Ohayocon 2013!
The skirt is a bit tight and the bag I made the night before the con, but I think it photos pretty well. Photos are by my friend Amanda and my sister Rjbritton
Stick tight! I hope to have art soon (hopefully!!)

very cool movie version Ramona. Looks super authentic.
ZoomInfo
zoroko:

I’ve been in a bit of an art rut and works been kicking my ass, so have a couple pictures of my new Ramona costume that I wore last weekend at Ohayocon 2013!
The skirt is a bit tight and the bag I made the night before the con, but I think it photos pretty well. Photos are by my friend Amanda and my sister Rjbritton
Stick tight! I hope to have art soon (hopefully!!)

very cool movie version Ramona. Looks super authentic.
ZoomInfo
zoroko:

I’ve been in a bit of an art rut and works been kicking my ass, so have a couple pictures of my new Ramona costume that I wore last weekend at Ohayocon 2013!
The skirt is a bit tight and the bag I made the night before the con, but I think it photos pretty well. Photos are by my friend Amanda and my sister Rjbritton
Stick tight! I hope to have art soon (hopefully!!)

very cool movie version Ramona. Looks super authentic.
ZoomInfo
zoroko:

I’ve been in a bit of an art rut and works been kicking my ass, so have a couple pictures of my new Ramona costume that I wore last weekend at Ohayocon 2013!
The skirt is a bit tight and the bag I made the night before the con, but I think it photos pretty well. Photos are by my friend Amanda and my sister Rjbritton
Stick tight! I hope to have art soon (hopefully!!)

very cool movie version Ramona. Looks super authentic.
ZoomInfo
zoroko:

I’ve been in a bit of an art rut and works been kicking my ass, so have a couple pictures of my new Ramona costume that I wore last weekend at Ohayocon 2013!
The skirt is a bit tight and the bag I made the night before the con, but I think it photos pretty well. Photos are by my friend Amanda and my sister Rjbritton
Stick tight! I hope to have art soon (hopefully!!)

very cool movie version Ramona. Looks super authentic.
ZoomInfo

zoroko:

I’ve been in a bit of an art rut and works been kicking my ass, so have a couple pictures of my new Ramona costume that I wore last weekend at Ohayocon 2013!

The skirt is a bit tight and the bag I made the night before the con, but I think it photos pretty well. Photos are by my friend Amanda and my sister Rjbritton

Stick tight! I hope to have art soon (hopefully!!)

very cool movie version Ramona. Looks super authentic.

shadester9 asked:

Seeing as people now use 'hipster' to describe virtually any subgroup they dislike, what did it mean in 2003 when you first used it?

In 2003 in Toronto the word “scenester” was tossed around a lot and I understood it to mean “a person who goes to shows and parties all the time and is fashionable and cool but probably shallow because all they do is go to shows and parties and work hard at looking fashionable and cool.”

In my early notes fro Scott Pilgrim vol 1 I indicated that Knives was going to attempt to morph into a “scenester chick” after meeting Scott (because that’s what she thinks he wants). As I wrote the actual book this evolved more into her being inspired & influenced by Kim and Ramona, the older, cooler girls.

In the actual book, I used the word “hipster” which came to replace “scenester” in 2004 — the “demon hipster chicks” are just supposed to be fashionable party girls who are demons. It’s more of a visual description than anything, and I thought the phrase “demon hipster chicks” was funny.

Scott Pilgrim the series was neither skewering nor celebrating “hipster culture”. I have always ignored the term. It started as a catch-all term for silly young people dressing funny and listening to the indiest music they could find, and was eventually co-opted by the wider culture as a social slur. “Hipster” is now almost exclusively a hateful term. Nobody should ever use it. It has become a bad word.

helperchan asked:

Hey there. This may seem stupid to ask, but I was wondering if you have a general portfolio for comics? I wanted to know what a professional's portfolio consisted of after they've released comics, and if you had one! I know the obvious answer is 'Scott Pilgrim, Lost At Sea,…', but what I mean is a collection of pages, inked/colored drawings, old sketches, as well as a list of works. Or is that stuff not necessary after releasing comics? Or is it a private thing people don't post online?

In this day and age I think a simple website with like 5-10 examples of what you do, a basic description of who you are (where you’re from and how old you are), and contact information (email) is more than sufficient.

When I go to a person’s site that’s all I want to know at a glance — how old are they? what do they do? do I like it? Just show enough work to make your style identifiable and make it clear that you have ‘chops’. I’m not a publisher or an editor but I definitely have hired people for small art jobs based on that much information.

If you’re an already-established freelancer it gets more complicated (like showing off all the stuff you’ve done for cool clients etc) but you should also be able to see that with a glance at the website, like “oh they’ve done a bunch of work for big clients, that’s cool”.

For me personally, I established a relationship with a publisher pretty early on and they knew me and knew what I could do and that I was developing my abilities. I never needed a portfolio after that — people could just look at my books and know everything about what I do.

I would say the ‘creative industry’ is MAINLY about relationships, and once you start establishing those, the superficial getting-to-know-you aspects of a portfolio or website are less essential (and often just sit there gathering dust while people are doing new and improved work).

spook-grunge-mom-deactivated201 asked:

This may seem weird, but how do you deal with working in panels? I've tried before but they just seem all weird and small and it makes me feel almost like I'm trapped if that makes any sense to you... I just feel like I need a bigger workspace for things. (Side-question: What program do you use when you do digital art?)

(question about drawing comics and fitting drawings into panels)

um it takes practice

Try again then again then try again and again and then try one thousand more times and then try two thousand more times and then try eight billion more times, then see how you feel about it.

(When I do digital art i just use photoshop.)