THE COMPLETELY DIFFERENT VOLUME 5

I alluded to this the other day. There was an early draft of volume 5, Scott Pilgrim Vs The Universe, that was very different. It had the same basic structure but it revolved around the fictional “Toronto International Battle of the Bands” — which, obviously, ended up being used as part of the structure for the movie. 

Which means, yes, I made up the battle of the bands stuff, I just didn’t use it in the book in the end. There was a two-stage setup — amp vs amp and all that. It would have been really really really hard to draw all this stuff.

Skimming over the old script now, it just tonally didn’t feel right, and I think that’s because at this point (late 2007 through mid 2008) I was spending a lot of time working with Edgar Wright and Michael Bacall on the movie, looking at casting tapes, etc. My original ‘voice’ for Scott & friends kind of got submerged for a minute and it took me several drafts to find it again.

So anyway, the plot of it was that Sex Bob-omb got signed up for the battle of the bands without their knowledge, and it was an obvious trap set by the Katayanagi Twins. The twins are musicians in this version, and also they wear Super Sentai-style masks when they perform, like Daft Punk or something. Sex Bob-omb goes in to the tournament completely unprepared, and they’re terrible, but they keep winning every round anyway (because it’s all a sham). All the other bands in Toronto start hating them.

The rest of the story was pretty much the same — the book was always about the band kinda falling apart and about Scott and Ramona kinda falling apart. It was just a lot bigger and sillier. There was a LOT going on and it would have been really hard to draw and I felt the need to simplify, so it turned into what you all know as volume 5.

Anyway, here are some unused excerpts I thought were amusing!
ZoomInfo
THE COMPLETELY DIFFERENT VOLUME 5

I alluded to this the other day. There was an early draft of volume 5, Scott Pilgrim Vs The Universe, that was very different. It had the same basic structure but it revolved around the fictional “Toronto International Battle of the Bands” — which, obviously, ended up being used as part of the structure for the movie. 

Which means, yes, I made up the battle of the bands stuff, I just didn’t use it in the book in the end. There was a two-stage setup — amp vs amp and all that. It would have been really really really hard to draw all this stuff.

Skimming over the old script now, it just tonally didn’t feel right, and I think that’s because at this point (late 2007 through mid 2008) I was spending a lot of time working with Edgar Wright and Michael Bacall on the movie, looking at casting tapes, etc. My original ‘voice’ for Scott & friends kind of got submerged for a minute and it took me several drafts to find it again.

So anyway, the plot of it was that Sex Bob-omb got signed up for the battle of the bands without their knowledge, and it was an obvious trap set by the Katayanagi Twins. The twins are musicians in this version, and also they wear Super Sentai-style masks when they perform, like Daft Punk or something. Sex Bob-omb goes in to the tournament completely unprepared, and they’re terrible, but they keep winning every round anyway (because it’s all a sham). All the other bands in Toronto start hating them.

The rest of the story was pretty much the same — the book was always about the band kinda falling apart and about Scott and Ramona kinda falling apart. It was just a lot bigger and sillier. There was a LOT going on and it would have been really hard to draw and I felt the need to simplify, so it turned into what you all know as volume 5.

Anyway, here are some unused excerpts I thought were amusing!
ZoomInfo
THE COMPLETELY DIFFERENT VOLUME 5

I alluded to this the other day. There was an early draft of volume 5, Scott Pilgrim Vs The Universe, that was very different. It had the same basic structure but it revolved around the fictional “Toronto International Battle of the Bands” — which, obviously, ended up being used as part of the structure for the movie. 

Which means, yes, I made up the battle of the bands stuff, I just didn’t use it in the book in the end. There was a two-stage setup — amp vs amp and all that. It would have been really really really hard to draw all this stuff.

Skimming over the old script now, it just tonally didn’t feel right, and I think that’s because at this point (late 2007 through mid 2008) I was spending a lot of time working with Edgar Wright and Michael Bacall on the movie, looking at casting tapes, etc. My original ‘voice’ for Scott & friends kind of got submerged for a minute and it took me several drafts to find it again.

So anyway, the plot of it was that Sex Bob-omb got signed up for the battle of the bands without their knowledge, and it was an obvious trap set by the Katayanagi Twins. The twins are musicians in this version, and also they wear Super Sentai-style masks when they perform, like Daft Punk or something. Sex Bob-omb goes in to the tournament completely unprepared, and they’re terrible, but they keep winning every round anyway (because it’s all a sham). All the other bands in Toronto start hating them.

The rest of the story was pretty much the same — the book was always about the band kinda falling apart and about Scott and Ramona kinda falling apart. It was just a lot bigger and sillier. There was a LOT going on and it would have been really hard to draw and I felt the need to simplify, so it turned into what you all know as volume 5.

Anyway, here are some unused excerpts I thought were amusing!
ZoomInfo
THE COMPLETELY DIFFERENT VOLUME 5

I alluded to this the other day. There was an early draft of volume 5, Scott Pilgrim Vs The Universe, that was very different. It had the same basic structure but it revolved around the fictional “Toronto International Battle of the Bands” — which, obviously, ended up being used as part of the structure for the movie. 

Which means, yes, I made up the battle of the bands stuff, I just didn’t use it in the book in the end. There was a two-stage setup — amp vs amp and all that. It would have been really really really hard to draw all this stuff.

Skimming over the old script now, it just tonally didn’t feel right, and I think that’s because at this point (late 2007 through mid 2008) I was spending a lot of time working with Edgar Wright and Michael Bacall on the movie, looking at casting tapes, etc. My original ‘voice’ for Scott & friends kind of got submerged for a minute and it took me several drafts to find it again.

So anyway, the plot of it was that Sex Bob-omb got signed up for the battle of the bands without their knowledge, and it was an obvious trap set by the Katayanagi Twins. The twins are musicians in this version, and also they wear Super Sentai-style masks when they perform, like Daft Punk or something. Sex Bob-omb goes in to the tournament completely unprepared, and they’re terrible, but they keep winning every round anyway (because it’s all a sham). All the other bands in Toronto start hating them.

The rest of the story was pretty much the same — the book was always about the band kinda falling apart and about Scott and Ramona kinda falling apart. It was just a lot bigger and sillier. There was a LOT going on and it would have been really hard to draw and I felt the need to simplify, so it turned into what you all know as volume 5.

Anyway, here are some unused excerpts I thought were amusing!
ZoomInfo
THE COMPLETELY DIFFERENT VOLUME 5

I alluded to this the other day. There was an early draft of volume 5, Scott Pilgrim Vs The Universe, that was very different. It had the same basic structure but it revolved around the fictional “Toronto International Battle of the Bands” — which, obviously, ended up being used as part of the structure for the movie. 

Which means, yes, I made up the battle of the bands stuff, I just didn’t use it in the book in the end. There was a two-stage setup — amp vs amp and all that. It would have been really really really hard to draw all this stuff.

Skimming over the old script now, it just tonally didn’t feel right, and I think that’s because at this point (late 2007 through mid 2008) I was spending a lot of time working with Edgar Wright and Michael Bacall on the movie, looking at casting tapes, etc. My original ‘voice’ for Scott & friends kind of got submerged for a minute and it took me several drafts to find it again.

So anyway, the plot of it was that Sex Bob-omb got signed up for the battle of the bands without their knowledge, and it was an obvious trap set by the Katayanagi Twins. The twins are musicians in this version, and also they wear Super Sentai-style masks when they perform, like Daft Punk or something. Sex Bob-omb goes in to the tournament completely unprepared, and they’re terrible, but they keep winning every round anyway (because it’s all a sham). All the other bands in Toronto start hating them.

The rest of the story was pretty much the same — the book was always about the band kinda falling apart and about Scott and Ramona kinda falling apart. It was just a lot bigger and sillier. There was a LOT going on and it would have been really hard to draw and I felt the need to simplify, so it turned into what you all know as volume 5.

Anyway, here are some unused excerpts I thought were amusing!
ZoomInfo
THE COMPLETELY DIFFERENT VOLUME 5

I alluded to this the other day. There was an early draft of volume 5, Scott Pilgrim Vs The Universe, that was very different. It had the same basic structure but it revolved around the fictional “Toronto International Battle of the Bands” — which, obviously, ended up being used as part of the structure for the movie. 

Which means, yes, I made up the battle of the bands stuff, I just didn’t use it in the book in the end. There was a two-stage setup — amp vs amp and all that. It would have been really really really hard to draw all this stuff.

Skimming over the old script now, it just tonally didn’t feel right, and I think that’s because at this point (late 2007 through mid 2008) I was spending a lot of time working with Edgar Wright and Michael Bacall on the movie, looking at casting tapes, etc. My original ‘voice’ for Scott & friends kind of got submerged for a minute and it took me several drafts to find it again.

So anyway, the plot of it was that Sex Bob-omb got signed up for the battle of the bands without their knowledge, and it was an obvious trap set by the Katayanagi Twins. The twins are musicians in this version, and also they wear Super Sentai-style masks when they perform, like Daft Punk or something. Sex Bob-omb goes in to the tournament completely unprepared, and they’re terrible, but they keep winning every round anyway (because it’s all a sham). All the other bands in Toronto start hating them.

The rest of the story was pretty much the same — the book was always about the band kinda falling apart and about Scott and Ramona kinda falling apart. It was just a lot bigger and sillier. There was a LOT going on and it would have been really hard to draw and I felt the need to simplify, so it turned into what you all know as volume 5.

Anyway, here are some unused excerpts I thought were amusing!
ZoomInfo
THE COMPLETELY DIFFERENT VOLUME 5

I alluded to this the other day. There was an early draft of volume 5, Scott Pilgrim Vs The Universe, that was very different. It had the same basic structure but it revolved around the fictional “Toronto International Battle of the Bands” — which, obviously, ended up being used as part of the structure for the movie. 

Which means, yes, I made up the battle of the bands stuff, I just didn’t use it in the book in the end. There was a two-stage setup — amp vs amp and all that. It would have been really really really hard to draw all this stuff.

Skimming over the old script now, it just tonally didn’t feel right, and I think that’s because at this point (late 2007 through mid 2008) I was spending a lot of time working with Edgar Wright and Michael Bacall on the movie, looking at casting tapes, etc. My original ‘voice’ for Scott & friends kind of got submerged for a minute and it took me several drafts to find it again.

So anyway, the plot of it was that Sex Bob-omb got signed up for the battle of the bands without their knowledge, and it was an obvious trap set by the Katayanagi Twins. The twins are musicians in this version, and also they wear Super Sentai-style masks when they perform, like Daft Punk or something. Sex Bob-omb goes in to the tournament completely unprepared, and they’re terrible, but they keep winning every round anyway (because it’s all a sham). All the other bands in Toronto start hating them.

The rest of the story was pretty much the same — the book was always about the band kinda falling apart and about Scott and Ramona kinda falling apart. It was just a lot bigger and sillier. There was a LOT going on and it would have been really hard to draw and I felt the need to simplify, so it turned into what you all know as volume 5.

Anyway, here are some unused excerpts I thought were amusing!
ZoomInfo
THE COMPLETELY DIFFERENT VOLUME 5

I alluded to this the other day. There was an early draft of volume 5, Scott Pilgrim Vs The Universe, that was very different. It had the same basic structure but it revolved around the fictional “Toronto International Battle of the Bands” — which, obviously, ended up being used as part of the structure for the movie. 

Which means, yes, I made up the battle of the bands stuff, I just didn’t use it in the book in the end. There was a two-stage setup — amp vs amp and all that. It would have been really really really hard to draw all this stuff.

Skimming over the old script now, it just tonally didn’t feel right, and I think that’s because at this point (late 2007 through mid 2008) I was spending a lot of time working with Edgar Wright and Michael Bacall on the movie, looking at casting tapes, etc. My original ‘voice’ for Scott & friends kind of got submerged for a minute and it took me several drafts to find it again.

So anyway, the plot of it was that Sex Bob-omb got signed up for the battle of the bands without their knowledge, and it was an obvious trap set by the Katayanagi Twins. The twins are musicians in this version, and also they wear Super Sentai-style masks when they perform, like Daft Punk or something. Sex Bob-omb goes in to the tournament completely unprepared, and they’re terrible, but they keep winning every round anyway (because it’s all a sham). All the other bands in Toronto start hating them.

The rest of the story was pretty much the same — the book was always about the band kinda falling apart and about Scott and Ramona kinda falling apart. It was just a lot bigger and sillier. There was a LOT going on and it would have been really hard to draw and I felt the need to simplify, so it turned into what you all know as volume 5.

Anyway, here are some unused excerpts I thought were amusing!
ZoomInfo

THE COMPLETELY DIFFERENT VOLUME 5

I alluded to this the other day. There was an early draft of volume 5, Scott Pilgrim Vs The Universe, that was very different. It had the same basic structure but it revolved around the fictional “Toronto International Battle of the Bands” — which, obviously, ended up being used as part of the structure for the movie.

Which means, yes, I made up the battle of the bands stuff, I just didn’t use it in the book in the end. There was a two-stage setup — amp vs amp and all that. It would have been really really really hard to draw all this stuff.

Skimming over the old script now, it just tonally didn’t feel right, and I think that’s because at this point (late 2007 through mid 2008) I was spending a lot of time working with Edgar Wright and Michael Bacall on the movie, looking at casting tapes, etc. My original ‘voice’ for Scott & friends kind of got submerged for a minute and it took me several drafts to find it again.

So anyway, the plot of it was that Sex Bob-omb got signed up for the battle of the bands without their knowledge, and it was an obvious trap set by the Katayanagi Twins. The twins are musicians in this version, and also they wear Super Sentai-style masks when they perform, like Daft Punk or something. Sex Bob-omb goes in to the tournament completely unprepared, and they’re terrible, but they keep winning every round anyway (because it’s all a sham). All the other bands in Toronto start hating them.

The rest of the story was pretty much the same — the book was always about the band kinda falling apart and about Scott and Ramona kinda falling apart. It was just a lot bigger and sillier. There was a LOT going on and it would have been really hard to draw and I felt the need to simplify, so it turned into what you all know as volume 5.

Anyway, here are some unused excerpts I thought were amusing!

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Really dumb unused scene from the script of Scott Pilgrim vol 2

(Scott is burrowed down in the chair, watching a Lucas Lee movie. Wallace is in the kitchen.)

SCOTT: (very whiny) Wallace, I wanna stop! This movie suuucks!

WALLACE: (firmly) You’re training!

SCOTT: (imploringly) Can I be done? I think I’m done.

WALLACE: (emerging from the kitchen) Which one is Lucas Lee?

(We see Lucas Lee on the screen with a girl. The movie looks dumb.)

SCOTT: (points) That guy!

WALLACE: Good! First stage complete!

SCOTT: What? That’s it? Why’d I have to get FIVE movies?

WALLACE: (shrugging) I thought recognition might take a while.

People often ask about my writing process. I was actually looking at the new edition of Scott Pilgrim 2 the other day like “how DID i write this?” and so I went into the archives and grabbed the outline and a few script pages…

(note: this book was originally created over Winter 2004-5 and released May 2005)

STEP ONE: NOTES (not shown) 
I scribbled all over notebooks and sketchbooks (and text files on the computer) figuring out scenes I wanted to show, themes I was thinking about, and the overall direction of the story

STEP TWO: OUTLINE
I turned my mess of ideas into a rough, straightforward, chronological outline (shown here)

STEP THREE: SCRIPT
I turned the rough outline into a basic script. 

At this point i was using a bastardized format of my own invention (seen here); later I went on to use a more standard ‘screenplay’ format. My scripts have always been largely dialogue-based with just the barest descriptions of stuff, since I’m writing for myself to draw, and I know what I want stuff to look like — or I figure I’ll worry about it later. (often to my detriment!)

I also want to note that I do a lot of adverb-descriptions on each line of dialogue, ie “offended”, “dismissive”, “incredulous” — that’s really just to remind myself what kind of facial expressions and “acting” I was thinking of. You’re not supposed to do that in a screenplay (via it’s rude to actors, who need to make their own decisions from moment to moment), but I think it makes a lot of sense for comics.

These pages are part of “scene 6-4” on the outline (I always name my scenes like Super Mario levels), which you can see right away I have decided to alternate between Scott/Kim and Scott/Lisa scenes, which wasn’t indicated on the outline at all. This made Scott into more of an active character, pushing the story forward as I intercut between his interactions with the two different girls. This also helped develop the subplot of Scott’s emotional entanglement with both girls.

STEP FOUR: THUMBNAILS
These were always really small, maybe two inches high. I can’t really explain this part of the process at all but I feel like this is where a lot of the magic happens. Somehow the text stuff goes in my brain and comes out in these weird scrappy little drawings that always closely resemble the final pages.

FINAL
Here are the finished pages (from the new edition, colour by Nathan Fairbairn) where you can see how some of the dialogue from the original script got dropped or reworked. These pages seem to have had a bare minimum of revision, though, compared to some of my later stuff (volume 4 script pages were like 85% crossed out and rewritten).

OH, BY THE WAY, THE COLOR EDITION VOLUME 2 OF SCOTT PILGRIM WILL BE IN STORES NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7th!
ZoomInfo
People often ask about my writing process. I was actually looking at the new edition of Scott Pilgrim 2 the other day like “how DID i write this?” and so I went into the archives and grabbed the outline and a few script pages…

(note: this book was originally created over Winter 2004-5 and released May 2005)

STEP ONE: NOTES (not shown) 
I scribbled all over notebooks and sketchbooks (and text files on the computer) figuring out scenes I wanted to show, themes I was thinking about, and the overall direction of the story

STEP TWO: OUTLINE
I turned my mess of ideas into a rough, straightforward, chronological outline (shown here)

STEP THREE: SCRIPT
I turned the rough outline into a basic script. 

At this point i was using a bastardized format of my own invention (seen here); later I went on to use a more standard ‘screenplay’ format. My scripts have always been largely dialogue-based with just the barest descriptions of stuff, since I’m writing for myself to draw, and I know what I want stuff to look like — or I figure I’ll worry about it later. (often to my detriment!)

I also want to note that I do a lot of adverb-descriptions on each line of dialogue, ie “offended”, “dismissive”, “incredulous” — that’s really just to remind myself what kind of facial expressions and “acting” I was thinking of. You’re not supposed to do that in a screenplay (via it’s rude to actors, who need to make their own decisions from moment to moment), but I think it makes a lot of sense for comics.

These pages are part of “scene 6-4” on the outline (I always name my scenes like Super Mario levels), which you can see right away I have decided to alternate between Scott/Kim and Scott/Lisa scenes, which wasn’t indicated on the outline at all. This made Scott into more of an active character, pushing the story forward as I intercut between his interactions with the two different girls. This also helped develop the subplot of Scott’s emotional entanglement with both girls.

STEP FOUR: THUMBNAILS
These were always really small, maybe two inches high. I can’t really explain this part of the process at all but I feel like this is where a lot of the magic happens. Somehow the text stuff goes in my brain and comes out in these weird scrappy little drawings that always closely resemble the final pages.

FINAL
Here are the finished pages (from the new edition, colour by Nathan Fairbairn) where you can see how some of the dialogue from the original script got dropped or reworked. These pages seem to have had a bare minimum of revision, though, compared to some of my later stuff (volume 4 script pages were like 85% crossed out and rewritten).

OH, BY THE WAY, THE COLOR EDITION VOLUME 2 OF SCOTT PILGRIM WILL BE IN STORES NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7th!
ZoomInfo
People often ask about my writing process. I was actually looking at the new edition of Scott Pilgrim 2 the other day like “how DID i write this?” and so I went into the archives and grabbed the outline and a few script pages…

(note: this book was originally created over Winter 2004-5 and released May 2005)

STEP ONE: NOTES (not shown) 
I scribbled all over notebooks and sketchbooks (and text files on the computer) figuring out scenes I wanted to show, themes I was thinking about, and the overall direction of the story

STEP TWO: OUTLINE
I turned my mess of ideas into a rough, straightforward, chronological outline (shown here)

STEP THREE: SCRIPT
I turned the rough outline into a basic script. 

At this point i was using a bastardized format of my own invention (seen here); later I went on to use a more standard ‘screenplay’ format. My scripts have always been largely dialogue-based with just the barest descriptions of stuff, since I’m writing for myself to draw, and I know what I want stuff to look like — or I figure I’ll worry about it later. (often to my detriment!)

I also want to note that I do a lot of adverb-descriptions on each line of dialogue, ie “offended”, “dismissive”, “incredulous” — that’s really just to remind myself what kind of facial expressions and “acting” I was thinking of. You’re not supposed to do that in a screenplay (via it’s rude to actors, who need to make their own decisions from moment to moment), but I think it makes a lot of sense for comics.

These pages are part of “scene 6-4” on the outline (I always name my scenes like Super Mario levels), which you can see right away I have decided to alternate between Scott/Kim and Scott/Lisa scenes, which wasn’t indicated on the outline at all. This made Scott into more of an active character, pushing the story forward as I intercut between his interactions with the two different girls. This also helped develop the subplot of Scott’s emotional entanglement with both girls.

STEP FOUR: THUMBNAILS
These were always really small, maybe two inches high. I can’t really explain this part of the process at all but I feel like this is where a lot of the magic happens. Somehow the text stuff goes in my brain and comes out in these weird scrappy little drawings that always closely resemble the final pages.

FINAL
Here are the finished pages (from the new edition, colour by Nathan Fairbairn) where you can see how some of the dialogue from the original script got dropped or reworked. These pages seem to have had a bare minimum of revision, though, compared to some of my later stuff (volume 4 script pages were like 85% crossed out and rewritten).

OH, BY THE WAY, THE COLOR EDITION VOLUME 2 OF SCOTT PILGRIM WILL BE IN STORES NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7th!
ZoomInfo
People often ask about my writing process. I was actually looking at the new edition of Scott Pilgrim 2 the other day like “how DID i write this?” and so I went into the archives and grabbed the outline and a few script pages…

(note: this book was originally created over Winter 2004-5 and released May 2005)

STEP ONE: NOTES (not shown) 
I scribbled all over notebooks and sketchbooks (and text files on the computer) figuring out scenes I wanted to show, themes I was thinking about, and the overall direction of the story

STEP TWO: OUTLINE
I turned my mess of ideas into a rough, straightforward, chronological outline (shown here)

STEP THREE: SCRIPT
I turned the rough outline into a basic script. 

At this point i was using a bastardized format of my own invention (seen here); later I went on to use a more standard ‘screenplay’ format. My scripts have always been largely dialogue-based with just the barest descriptions of stuff, since I’m writing for myself to draw, and I know what I want stuff to look like — or I figure I’ll worry about it later. (often to my detriment!)

I also want to note that I do a lot of adverb-descriptions on each line of dialogue, ie “offended”, “dismissive”, “incredulous” — that’s really just to remind myself what kind of facial expressions and “acting” I was thinking of. You’re not supposed to do that in a screenplay (via it’s rude to actors, who need to make their own decisions from moment to moment), but I think it makes a lot of sense for comics.

These pages are part of “scene 6-4” on the outline (I always name my scenes like Super Mario levels), which you can see right away I have decided to alternate between Scott/Kim and Scott/Lisa scenes, which wasn’t indicated on the outline at all. This made Scott into more of an active character, pushing the story forward as I intercut between his interactions with the two different girls. This also helped develop the subplot of Scott’s emotional entanglement with both girls.

STEP FOUR: THUMBNAILS
These were always really small, maybe two inches high. I can’t really explain this part of the process at all but I feel like this is where a lot of the magic happens. Somehow the text stuff goes in my brain and comes out in these weird scrappy little drawings that always closely resemble the final pages.

FINAL
Here are the finished pages (from the new edition, colour by Nathan Fairbairn) where you can see how some of the dialogue from the original script got dropped or reworked. These pages seem to have had a bare minimum of revision, though, compared to some of my later stuff (volume 4 script pages were like 85% crossed out and rewritten).

OH, BY THE WAY, THE COLOR EDITION VOLUME 2 OF SCOTT PILGRIM WILL BE IN STORES NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7th!
ZoomInfo
People often ask about my writing process. I was actually looking at the new edition of Scott Pilgrim 2 the other day like “how DID i write this?” and so I went into the archives and grabbed the outline and a few script pages…

(note: this book was originally created over Winter 2004-5 and released May 2005)

STEP ONE: NOTES (not shown) 
I scribbled all over notebooks and sketchbooks (and text files on the computer) figuring out scenes I wanted to show, themes I was thinking about, and the overall direction of the story

STEP TWO: OUTLINE
I turned my mess of ideas into a rough, straightforward, chronological outline (shown here)

STEP THREE: SCRIPT
I turned the rough outline into a basic script. 

At this point i was using a bastardized format of my own invention (seen here); later I went on to use a more standard ‘screenplay’ format. My scripts have always been largely dialogue-based with just the barest descriptions of stuff, since I’m writing for myself to draw, and I know what I want stuff to look like — or I figure I’ll worry about it later. (often to my detriment!)

I also want to note that I do a lot of adverb-descriptions on each line of dialogue, ie “offended”, “dismissive”, “incredulous” — that’s really just to remind myself what kind of facial expressions and “acting” I was thinking of. You’re not supposed to do that in a screenplay (via it’s rude to actors, who need to make their own decisions from moment to moment), but I think it makes a lot of sense for comics.

These pages are part of “scene 6-4” on the outline (I always name my scenes like Super Mario levels), which you can see right away I have decided to alternate between Scott/Kim and Scott/Lisa scenes, which wasn’t indicated on the outline at all. This made Scott into more of an active character, pushing the story forward as I intercut between his interactions with the two different girls. This also helped develop the subplot of Scott’s emotional entanglement with both girls.

STEP FOUR: THUMBNAILS
These were always really small, maybe two inches high. I can’t really explain this part of the process at all but I feel like this is where a lot of the magic happens. Somehow the text stuff goes in my brain and comes out in these weird scrappy little drawings that always closely resemble the final pages.

FINAL
Here are the finished pages (from the new edition, colour by Nathan Fairbairn) where you can see how some of the dialogue from the original script got dropped or reworked. These pages seem to have had a bare minimum of revision, though, compared to some of my later stuff (volume 4 script pages were like 85% crossed out and rewritten).

OH, BY THE WAY, THE COLOR EDITION VOLUME 2 OF SCOTT PILGRIM WILL BE IN STORES NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7th!
ZoomInfo

People often ask about my writing process. I was actually looking at the new edition of Scott Pilgrim 2 the other day like “how DID i write this?” and so I went into the archives and grabbed the outline and a few script pages…

(note: this book was originally created over Winter 2004-5 and released May 2005)

STEP ONE: NOTES (not shown)
I scribbled all over notebooks and sketchbooks (and text files on the computer) figuring out scenes I wanted to show, themes I was thinking about, and the overall direction of the story

STEP TWO: OUTLINE
I turned my mess of ideas into a rough, straightforward, chronological outline (shown here)

STEP THREE: SCRIPT
I turned the rough outline into a basic script.

At this point i was using a bastardized format of my own invention (seen here); later I went on to use a more standard ‘screenplay’ format. My scripts have always been largely dialogue-based with just the barest descriptions of stuff, since I’m writing for myself to draw, and I know what I want stuff to look like — or I figure I’ll worry about it later. (often to my detriment!)

I also want to note that I do a lot of adverb-descriptions on each line of dialogue, ie “offended”, “dismissive”, “incredulous” — that’s really just to remind myself what kind of facial expressions and “acting” I was thinking of. You’re not supposed to do that in a screenplay (via it’s rude to actors, who need to make their own decisions from moment to moment), but I think it makes a lot of sense for comics.

These pages are part of “scene 6-4” on the outline (I always name my scenes like Super Mario levels), which you can see right away I have decided to alternate between Scott/Kim and Scott/Lisa scenes, which wasn’t indicated on the outline at all. This made Scott into more of an active character, pushing the story forward as I intercut between his interactions with the two different girls. This also helped develop the subplot of Scott’s emotional entanglement with both girls.

STEP FOUR: THUMBNAILS
These were always really small, maybe two inches high. I can’t really explain this part of the process at all but I feel like this is where a lot of the magic happens. Somehow the text stuff goes in my brain and comes out in these weird scrappy little drawings that always closely resemble the final pages.

FINAL
Here are the finished pages (from the new edition, colour by Nathan Fairbairn) where you can see how some of the dialogue from the original script got dropped or reworked. These pages seem to have had a bare minimum of revision, though, compared to some of my later stuff (volume 4 script pages were like 85% crossed out and rewritten).

OH, BY THE WAY, THE COLOR EDITION VOLUME 2 OF SCOTT PILGRIM WILL BE IN STORES NEXT WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 7th!

excerpt from the script for “Scott Pilgrim Gets It Together”, 2006(?)

a lot of this stuff ended up in the movie, so it’s weird to look at this and see that pretty much everything good/funny about the Roxy intro scene was just scribbled in the margins as I was drawing; it wasn’t in the original script at all.